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  1. #106
    Senior Member    Dresdner
    May 2015
    2,805
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  2. #107
    Member
    Jan 2020
    59
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    ; 03-10-2020 15:55.

  3. #108
    Senior Member    Dresdner
    May 2015
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  4. #109
    FullgaZ    lokimonster
    May 2015
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    Sent from my Redmi Note 9 Pro using Tapatalk
    lokimonster; 04-10-2020 14:59.

    !!!
    SIC TRANSIT GLORIA MUNDI

  5. #110
    Senior Member    NAOR2207
    Feb 2018
    711
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  6. #111
    Senior Member    NAOR2207
    Feb 2018
    711

  7. #112
    Senior Member
    Apr 2018
    808
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    https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/view/...ew-coronavirus


    an initial hesitancy by governments to communicate decisively, even about the uncertainty and unknowns surrounding the pandemic has left space for misinformation to proliferate as people searched for answers. Instead, being clear about uncertainty is important to convey scientific advice that is subject to change with emerging evidence

    public communication entails providing information for the public interest that is factual, transparent and separate from political communication. The latter feature is especially relevant to the present context of high political polarization and fragmentation in many countries, whereby some groups may be more likely to turn away from official information if they perceive it to be politicized.

    In order to be effective and foster public trust in government, any activities conducted in this respect must be guided by the principles of transparency, integrity, accountability, and stakeholder participation

    misguided or inconsistent communications risk eroding trust and being counterproductive. Governments and institutions can do greater damage and amplify the effects of disinformation by not communicating sufficiently and withholding information.

    85%of survey...prefer hearing from scientists rather than politicians. In Belgium and Portugal, among other countries, public breifings on the pandemic are delivered by scientific experts.

    During crises, disclosing uncertainty about the nature of the problem and the big decisions to be taken is paramount...withholding information or not being open about what is known and what is not fuels suspicion and distrust, which are equally dangerous to public order and the efficacy of emergency measures.
    Maintaining transparency and proactively informing citizens is increasingly recognized as one of the most effective ways to support policy implementations and restore trust, while debunking rumors... it also provides appropriate means for government accountability over their handling of the pandemic.

  8. #113
    Senior Member
    Apr 2018
    808
    " ( ...):
    https://www.un.org/victimsofterroris...april_2020.pdf


    The aim is threefold: to strengthen the effectiveness of the response to the immediate global health threat; mitigate the broader impact of the crisis on peoples lives; and avoid creating new or exacerbating existing problems.
    Against a backdrop of rising ethnonationalism, populism, authoritarianism and pushback against human rights in some countries, the crisis can provide a pretext to adopt repressive measures for purposes unrelated to the pandemic. The instability and fear that the pandemic engenders is exacerbating existing human rights concerns, such as discrimination against certain groups, hate speech, xenophobia, attacks,...

    the impact of lockdowns on jobs, livelihoods, access to services, including health care, food, water, education and social services, safety at home, adequate standards of living and family life can be severe. As the world is discovering, freedom of movement is a crucial right that facilitates the enjoyment of many other rights.
    While international law permits certain restrictions on freedom of movement, including for reasons of security and national emergency like health emergencies, restrictions on free movement should be strictly necessary for that purpose, proportionate and nondiscriminatory. The availability of effective and generalized testing and tracing, and targeted quarantine measures, can mitigate the need for more indiscriminate restrictions.
    This impact comes from the disease itself but also from the measures necessary to combat it coming up against underlying factors like inequalities and weak protection systems. It falls disproportionately on some people, often those least able to protect themselves. Effective action to mitigate the worst impacts, on jobs, livelihoods, access to basic services and family life, protect peoples lives, enable people to com-ply with public health measures and ease recovery once these measures can be lifted.

    Never before has the importance of the responsibility of governments to protect people, by guaranteeing their economic and social rights, been so clearly demonstrated. Countries that have invested in protecting economic and social rights are likely to be more resilient.
    If the virus persists in one community, it remains a threat to all communities, so discriminatory practices place us all at risk. There are indications that the virus, and its impact, are disproportionately affecting certain communities

    To effectively combat the pandemic, we all need to be part of the response. Effective participation in the response requires people to be informed, involved in decisions that affect them and to see that any measures taken are necessary, reasonable and proportionate to combat the virus and save lives. We all have a role to play but the most effective way to maximize participation is through evidence, persuasion and collective ownership. People need agency and voice in a crisis. This is a time when, more than ever, governments need to be open and transparent, responsive and accountable to the people they are seeking to protect.
    Cooperation may become harder to maintain if the virus continues to spread and measures need to be extended in time and scope. The best way to maintain public support for the measures is for governments to be open and transparent and involve people in making the decisions that affect them. It is important to be honest about the extent of the threat posed by the virus, demonstrate that measures are reasonable, likely to be effective and will not last longer than needed. Securing compliance depends on building trust, and trust depends on transparency and participation.
    Authorities need to be open and transparent in their decision-making and willing to listen to and respond to criticism.
    Governments need to be accountable to the people they are seeking to protect.
    Democratic oversight of the pandemic response, especially the use of emergency powers, must be maintained.
    Some Governments have empowered or created an independent or opposition-led parliamentary committee, which meets publicly online, to scrutinize executive action during the crisis.
    Emergency and security measures, if needed, must be temporary, proportional and aimed at protecting people
    Heavy-handed security responses undermine the health response and can exacerbate existing threats to peace and security or create new ones. The best response is one that aims to respond proportionately to immediate threats whilst protecting human rights under the rule of law.
    The pandemic has led to countries imposing emergency and security measures. While in most cases these are needed to fight the virus, they can also be politically driven and may be easily abused. The pandemic could provide a pretext to undermine democratic institutions, quash legitimate dissent or disfavored people or groups, with far-reaching consequences that we will live with far beyond the immediate crisis. Although coercive measures may be justified in certain situations, they can backfire if applied in a heavy-handed, disproportionate way, undermining the whole pandemic response itself.
    Fairness, justice and respect for the rule of law are needed to strengthen and support the national effort on the public health front. Courts and the administration of justice must continue to function despite the constraints imposed by the crisis.

    use of technologies, including artificial intelligence and big data, to enforce emergency and security restrictions or for surveillance and tracking of impacted populations raise concerns. The potential for abuse is high: what is justified during an emergency now may become normalized once the crisis has passed. All measures must incorporate meaningful data protection safeguards, be lawful, necessary, and proportionate, time-bound and justified by legitimate public health objectives.

  9. #114
    Senior Member
    Sep 2018
    997
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    SUZUKI GSX ES 550 E 1986
    HONDA NC 750 X 2016
    KTM 1090 Adventure S 2018



  10. #115
    Senior Member
    Apr 2018
    808
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  1. : 3
    : 21-08-2017, 21:34
  2. ?
    yshekel
    : 13
    : 17-04-2017, 09:48
  3. (") .
    ranirotem
    : 5
    : 23-12-2016, 10:22
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    vy17206
    : 12
    : 09-11-2016, 10:42
  5. : 16
    : 22-06-2016, 10:31
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